Category Archives: writing advice

the word RESEARCH spelled in Scrabble letters on a diagonal

Documenting Your Research

Documenting Your Research: Best Practices for the Indie Author

the word RESEARCH spelled in Scrabble letters on a diagonal

Do your research—and track it, too. CC image Research photo credit: Phlebotomy Tech. Some rights reserved.

How do I keep track of where I found my information? What information or which sources are okay to use? Do I need to worry about format?

I work with a lot of nonfiction authors, and I get this type of question a lot. But questions of research apply to all writers, whether fiction or nonfiction. You shouldn’t lay claim to work that is not yours, for reasons of credibility and because legally, it’s the wise thing to do.*

When I discuss documenting research with my authors, I include an additional layer of consideration, equally important to the creative process, although not a legal requirement: how can you best keep track of your sources in a manner that most supports your writing? This addition is important to me because of the ways writers can get sucked down rabbit holes of research, whether to answer legitimate questions or as a way to avoid writing.

Continue reading

Give the Gift of a First Draft

Give Yourself the Gift of a First Draft

Give Yourself the Gift of a First Draft

As writers, we talk a good game with our quotes on creativity.

We bandy the coolest-sounding advice phrases from successful authors and pretend we totally agree with them.

Unfortunately, this is almost always lip service. We agree with these successful authors…when it comes to anyone else’s manuscript. When it comes to our own manuscript, though…well, we’re just special, aren’t we?

One of my favorites is from Terry Pratchett, and it’s about the first draft.

“The first draft is just you telling yourself the story.”

Give the Gift of a First Draft

Your first draft does not have to be perfect. Keep pushing through it to get to the next phase, making it better. Image courtesy of Big Stock. Some rights reserved.

Sounds wonderful, doesn’t it? I’m sure if you were having coffee with a writer friend right now, you’d thoroughly enjoy telling them this and nodding sagely. Continue reading

Wrestling an incomplete manuscript book coaching

Wrestling the Incomplete Manuscript: Book Coaching

Wrestling the Incomplete Manuscript: Book Coaching

“I’ve started writing a book, and I can’t figure out how to finish it.”

“I think I have an outline, but how do I go about writing a complete book?”

“Can anyone help me while I’m in the process of writing my book?”

Editing is great and all, but until you have a complete manuscript—a full story with a beginning, middle, and end—professional editing is of limited value to you. While you’re actively writing, other types of feedback pack a bigger punch, which is why some writers turn to coaches in their book creation process.

Wrestling an incomplete manuscript book coaching

A book coach can help you during the writing process. Image courtesy of Big Stock. Some rights reserved.

Do any of the above scenarios sound like you? I’ve coached authors who’ve gotten deep into manuscripts and lost the thread, writers who want actionable feedback on how to make their story better, and would-be authors who seek accountability and ongoing support. All that being said, coaching is not for everyone—and now may not be the time you want or need it.

Book Coaching: The Basics

Most writers turn to coaches for a combination of accountability (that manuscript you started ages ago and never finished), and ongoing feedback (comments/revisions to make your work better as you’re writing it). Some level of cheerleading is also included, because every writer can use someone who supports their work.

All good coaching involves outline development. This means creating a structure you’ll use to guide you as you write. Your coach may work with you to create an outline, or if you already have one, review it to help you stay on task and on target. Don’t like outlines? We can guide you through using mind maps or other techniques that capture the big picture.

Coaching by definition is book development. We’re asking the same big questions the developmental edit asks, only we’re asking them over and over again.

  • What is your concept?
  • Who is your audience?
  • What is the overall structure and how can you develop your ideas?
A book coach will help you fine tune your concept, audience, and book structure. Click To Tweet

If you’ve read my blog post from last month, these questions might sound suspiciously like the Big Four Questions everyone should ask their manuscript.

In addition, coaching pays close attention to:

  • Your writing strengths and weaknesses
  • Strategies you can use to help you meet your writing goals

Depending on your needs (and payment choices), coaching can be very “high-touch.” You might be speaking with your coach or sharing revisions back and forth on an intensive basis. Or, you can decide on a less-intensive schedule of feedback, on a spectrum that suits you.

Coaching is a flexible arrangement. It’s also a great way to build accountability into your writing process and ensure you meet your deadlines, whether self-imposed or external. However, it is not for everyone, all the time.

Coaching is a great way to build accountability into your writing process and help you meet deadlines. Click To Tweet

When Book Coaching is NOT for You

Fiction authors, in particular, can go through a long process of story discovery. If you are playing with a variety of ideas and characters, and a big story arc or character hasn’t solidified for you as the central figure, coaching may be premature.

Alternatively, if you want to hone your craft and tinker with a variety of ideas big and small, coaching may also not be appropriate. In these cases, I recommend taking writer’s workshops, and/or attending writer’s groups in the genre of your interest.

And finally, if you want help writing your book, and what you mean by that is “can someone else write this for me?” the answer is yes. This person is a ghostwriter, not a coach.

When Workshops and Writer’s Groups May Be Helpful Instead

Nonfiction writers can also benefit from classes and writer’s groups. You can connect with like-minded writers who share personal experiences and best practices. And you can find workshops on book proposals and building your platform, all of which helps your book.

You can find literary hubs in many cities. In Denver, we have Lighthouse Writer’s Workshop; Minneapolis has The Loft; Boston has Grub Street; Seattle Hugo House; you get the idea. The Loft has a listing of literary organizations, as does Writer’s Market. Find a group that works for you, and work on your craft in a supportive environment.

In my experience, most of these hubs focus on traditional publication, and some may be more open to the idea of self-publishing than others. However, they have excellent instructors and you can learn a LOT about the craft of writing, as well as find a community of like-minded people.

The Bottom Line: What a Coach Can and Cannot Do

Know this: your coach will not write your book for you. If you begin work with someone as a coach, and your arrangement morphs to where they are doing the writing, instead of you, what you now have is a ghostwriter.

A book coach can be a great resource for you as you tackle a manuscript that doesn’t want to get done. Consider what you want from your coach: accountability, craft tips, help with the outline, and so on. Interview your coach just as you would your editor.

Coaches can’t make you do what you don’t want to do. We can give you lots of great advice about the writing and revision process. We can give you great feedback on your ideas, your arc, your characters and style. We’re a great source of tips on how to break through writer’s block. But we can’t make you write your book. You still need to put in the work.

== ==

Subscribe to the monthly newsletter and get all future blog posts delivered to your inbox. You’ll also receive instant access to the How to Find an Editor: a Resource for Independent and Self-Publishing Writers:

  • Learn what to look for in an editor & what questions to ask
  • Determine what kind of help you need & how the process works
  • Get tips on where to find the editor that’s right for you

Sign up today!

== ==

Young Woman Writes To Black Diary

The Four Questions to Ask Your Nonfiction Book (They’re Good For Fiction, Too)

The Four Questions to Ask Your Nonfiction Book
(They’re Good For Fiction, Too)

Many first-time authors come to me with a book idea or a book started, and they’re not sure how to proceed. The question they often ask first is, “How should I tell this story? What’s the best way to tell this story?” Continue reading

colorful picture of boardwalk storefronts with sign saying fun zone

Have Fun While Writing Your Book—You’ll Be More Successful

Have Fun While Writing Your Book–You’ll Be More Successful

colorful picture of boardwalk storefronts with sign saying fun zone

Not what everyone thinks about while writing their book. CC image “fun zone” courtesy of Sandy Schultz on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Some folks consider writing a book a chore. After working on the manuscript for several months (or years), unfortunately, it can start to feel this way, including for those of us who begin with enthusiasm. You may wonder if all you’ve got is one long, dreary task list to plow through.

Finishing a book definitely takes work, no doubt about it. But if we’re going to spend so much time on this project, I want to make sure the process isn’t unrelieved misery. Let’s explore a few ways we can keep the fun in our writing process.

Find reasons to celebrate

Sounds obvious, right? How often do you do that, though? My bet: you’re waiting to celebrate until you’re “finished.”

Wrong idea.

What does “finished” mean? When you finish writing the first draft? When you finish revising? Going through the book with your editor? When the book is published?

Pick smaller milestones. Much smaller. Smaller still.

Celebrate when you complete your daily writing goal. Celebrate when you nailed that character description. Celebrate when you develop your outline. Celebrate choosing a title (even a working title). Celebrate when you wrote something—anything—no matter how awful, on a day when you wanted to write nothing at all.

Your celebrations can take many forms. A happy dance around your house. Dinner with friends. A Netflix mini-binge. A coloring book (children not required).

You spend a lot of time acting as your own worst critic. Time to be your number one fan, as well.

Treat writing as playtime

If you’ve seen my other posts, some of these suggestions should ring familiar. Some people write best when they sit down at a clean desk with their laptop in front of them—all business. After a few months/years, though…

Even if this comfortable writer is you, I encourage you to experiment.

  1. Write by hand.
  2. Use a “nonstandard” writing tool: pencil (graphite or colored), crayon, marker, fancy ink, the list goes on.
  3. Buy a roll of butcher paper, spread it out and tape it down to a surface, and write all over this, in the tool of your choosing. You can tape it to a wall, wrap your kitchen table with it, or if you have a hardwood floor, tape it on the floor so you can walk all over it. If you’re going to use a marker or pen that may saturate through, tape down several layers. Butcher paper is super affordable (your gorgeous floor or table, perhaps not so much).
  4. Every so often, write in a different location. I know I encourage you to make daily writing a habit as much as possible, and a predictable routine is part of that. Sometimes, though, you need to change it up. Even if the change is as small as another room in your house.
  5. Like hats? Get a couple of fun ones: your writing hat, your thinking cap, your editorial hat. Switch it up while you work.

Schedule writing “vacations”

All of us need a break from work now and then. That’s why there are weekends, and vacations (I personally know quite a few people who bring their work with them into these timeframes, which defeats the purpose, by the way). Set up writing holidays the same way (and treat them better than my workaholic friends).

Are you great at writing in sprints? Stretches of time where you do nothing else? Schedule a sprint, followed by some time off where you are not allowed to write.

Do you excel at the slow and steady? A little bit of the book at a time, all routine? Pick a predictable interval to schedule a non-writing interlude. Is it once a month? Every other month? Maybe you only need a few days to recharge, or a whole week or two sounds good.

Whatever method you choose, schedule the time off—and the time back on. That way, you can holiday guilt-free, because you know you are doing the work. And you can work knowing that your next break is just around the corner.

The bottom line

All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy. Find ways to insert fun into the writing process, take breaks, and above all, celebrate every step you take. The road can be long. Let’s enjoy the trip.

== ==

Subscribe to the monthly newsletter and get all future blog posts delivered to your inbox. You’ll also receive instant access to the How to Find an Editor: a Resource for Independent and Self-Publishing Writers:

  • Learn what to look for in an editor & what questions to ask
  • Determine what kind of help you need & how the process works
  • Get tips on where to find the editor that’s right for you

Sign up today!

== ==

Why Word Count is One of the Best Tools in Your Writing Toolbox

Why Word Count is One of the Best Tools in Your Writing Toolbox

woman in exercise clothing doing a pushup

Word count–the workout your book needs. CC image “62” courtesy of Fit Approach on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Writing is a lot like exercise. Most of us like the end result more than the process of getting there.

We like being strong, healthy, feeling good about our weight. We don’t like going for a run, or taking the time to go to the gym, or changing how we eat.

Likewise, we like holding the book we wrote in our hands, the feeling of accomplishment, the glow of success and recognition. We dislike editing, revision, and sitting down to write when we absolutely, 100%, do not feel inspired to do so. In fact, more writers clean their bathrooms as a way to avoid writing than you could ever imagine.

The fact is, though, that we need to write, in order to have written. The best way to do this is through regular writing practice, and one of the best ways to adopt a regular writing practice is to set word count goals. Continue reading

The End Makes the Best Beginning

The End Makes the Best Beginning

boy crossing race finish line with his arms in the air to celebrate

The End! CC image “Mike to Mike Half Marathon” courtesy of Fort Bragg on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Most of your readers will start reading your book at the beginning. That doesn’t mean you should start writing there.

The beginnings of books are notoriously tough to pin down. So much rides on those first pages, even the first sentences. Continue reading

closeup of outline or mind map diagram

Creating a Book Outline—a Flexible Structure that Works for You

Creating a Book Outline—a Flexible Structure that Works for You

closeup of outline or mind map diagram

CC image “mind map” courtesy of madstreetz on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Little divides writers as much as whether they should write a book outline or not. These two big categories are the pantsers, and the planners.

The planners, as you might expect, begin with a plan. They decide what they are going to write about, in what order the story should unfold, the main points they want to hit, and they typically create a detailed outline. Then, they write according to this plan.

Pantsers discover the story and the book as they go. Though they typically start out with an idea of what they want—the beginning and ending are common anchors—they don’t know, as they begin, how they’re going to get to the end. They “fly by the seat of their pants.”

Planners think of pantsers as disorganized and chaotic, and pantsers think of planners as rigid and unimaginative. Both these assessments are true and false in equal measure. Continue reading

old word processing keyboard with Ooops button. writing mistakes

Writing About Real People: Making sure they don’t hate you or sue you after you publish

Writing About Real People: Making sure they don’t hate you or sue you after you publish

old word processing keyboard with Ooops button. writing mistakes

You don’t want to feel this way about your story. CC image “Oops.” courtesy of Marcin Wichary on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Writers of all stripes constantly draw from real life. Nonfiction and memoir material obviously depend on real people, and even fictional characters are drawn from what we know and have experienced. The question is: How much “real” information can we include in our work? Is there a limit, and if so, where is it? Can we use real names? What is OK to say, and how can we be both respectful and legally safe while maintaining truth and honesty in our work?

Not everyone is happy to find themselves portrayed in a book. Our writing has real-world consequences, some of them less pleasant than an uncomfortable holiday meal after we’ve aired our family’s dirty laundry to the world. There may be legal ramifications. Below I discuss best practices for writing about real people and factual events.

Note, this post is meant as a guideline ONLY. I am not a legal professional and in no way does the following constitute legal advice. Also, this article is not about journalism or journalistic ethics and obligations. If you have a question, please consult a legal professional.

Real-world effects of writing about real people

Negative fallout from telling real stories falls into one of two categories: people who never speak to us again, and people who sue us. Both of these are frightening for different reasons, although people who sue us can have a vastly broader impact on our lives.

And negative fallout typically comes because we share less-than-flattering stories. Let’s face it: if we’re being outrageously complimentary, who’s going to object to that? Legally speaking, compliments are a non-issue, while real or perceived insults need our more careful attention.

If you’re wondering whether you might face difficulties when you talk about real people, ask yourself these questions:

  • Can your portrayal be seen as unfavorable or slanderous?
  • Are you lying or being “malicious”?
  • Can the characters be readily identified by name or other characteristics?

Writing that is respectful and legally safe

Sometimes unhappy stories are the reason for your work in the first place. If you’re writing a memoir about overcoming a tough chapter from your life, that tough story is probably necessary. In nonfiction, real-life examples are important. If you’re writing fiction, your characters need to grow, change, and face obstacles, otherwise there is no book—and real experiences are great sources of fictional narrative.

In all cases, you need to maintain truth and honesty. However, this doesn’t mean you need to drag a specific person through the mud. Be respectful—even if you feel certain people don’t deserve it.

Think about the larger ramifications of what you’re sharing: what serves the story you want to tell? Do you need to identify your boss Jim by name, description, and personal habits? Or do you need to convey how his behavior affected you personally?

Strategies for how to write about real people in your book

Some writers are so concerned about reactions to their book that they wait until the affected people die before publishing. This is one way to avoid offending anyone and having them sue you, but it doesn’t suit everyone and I encourage you to explore other options.

Get permission.

This is the simplest way to include real information about real people. Get written permission from them to use it. Now, you may argue that this isn’t necessarily easy, but easy and simple are two different things.

Change the character name and other identifying characteristics.

You probably don’t want to name your awful character after your boss Jim. Re-naming your characters (whether real or fictional) is an obvious first step. Since we can identify people by more than names, make sure you also change other details, such as physical characteristics, habits, personal interests and hobbies, and so on.

Here’s where being honest to the story comes in. Fiction writers may have an easier time with this concept than nonfiction writers. Say Jim is obsessive: great, do we need him to obsess about baseball scores, the way live Jim does? How about making him a fiend for a perfectly mowed lawn?

Create composite characters.

Use professional back story from one person, the obsessive personality traits from another, a love of gardenias from a third, and so on. Jim could be a lawn-mowing-obsessed female mathematician. You get the idea. Use multiple real-life figures so that the new composite doesn’t match any one person. You can be faithful to the character’s agency in the story without insulting someone you hope to have Thanksgiving dinner with, or inspiring an erstwhile colleague to drag you to court.

The bottom line

Best practices to keep yourself safe and respectful, while staying true to the story that you need to tell, include asking yourself how unflattering your portraits are, how recognizable your characters are (or need to be), and whether you are making your characters ugly and stupid out of spite. Ask yourself: what serves the story? Get permission to speak about people if you can, and respect their privacy by changing identifying details that are not relevant to the lesson or insight that you want to share.

The legal ramifications of talking about real people in your book can be more complicated than you think. When in doubt, please do seek professional advice.

==

What are some of your concerns when you write about real people?

== ==

Subscribe to the monthly newsletter and get all future blog posts delivered to your inbox. You’ll also receive instant access to the How to Find an Editor: a Resource for Independent and Self-Publishing Writers:

  • Learn what to look for in an editor & what questions to ask
  • Determine what kind of help you need & how the process works
  • Get tips on where to find the editor that’s right for you

Sign up today!

== ==

Books to Inspire Writers

Books to Inspire Writers

word map using inspiration and related terms

CC image “Inspiration” courtesy of photosteve101 on Flickr. Some rights reserved.

During this week when the word “love” is in the air—for all kinds of reasons, some of them commerce, I mean, Hallmark—I played on social media with the theme “book love.” I even used that hashtag (#booklove) on Twitter.

Now, Seth Godin I am not, though the idea got me thinking. None of us works in a void. As writers, we are inspired and guided by what we read. Writing well means reading. Some of what we read may be didactic—The Elements of Style, for example, or, in my case, Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation, by Lynne Truss. Most of what inspires us does so because of what it is: good writing, a good story, characters we can’t let go of, the voice of an author that we recognize and admire.

In keeping with the spirit of #booklove, below are starting points for writing reference and inspiration. Honestly, this list is individual to me, and could go on forever. My hope is you’ll see a little of what you are looking for, when you write. Continue reading